Closest IRIX substitute...

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jp_fan
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Closest IRIX substitute...

Unread postby jp_fan » Fri Oct 20, 2006 5:29 pm

I currently don't own any SGI hardware and might not for a while (in college and all), but I am wanting to learn some of these UNIX/UNIX-based OSes a little better. Up until a few months ago, I had only used Windows (Windows 3.1, 95, 98, 98SE, 2000 Pro, XP Pro, Server 2003 Enterprise). I am taking a course in Linux administration where we are using Fedora Core 5, but I am, honestly, not a fan of Fedora. I rather like the look of the GNOME desktop, but Fedora feels VERY sluggish to me, performance-wise, and I am not happy with it.

I am wondering... What is the closest relative to IRIX that I might be able to snag for free from the internet for an x86 platform? I would like to have a similar "utilitarian" look and feel to the desktop (GUI is an absolute MUST as I am just barely familiar with Linux/UNIX commands). I want something with a nice, light GUI that doesn't eat up much memory or hurt performance much.

Does anyone know of such a beast? I've looked at Plan9 and Inferno, which look interesting, but I cannot seem to understand how to run _any_ program on the thing... :oops:

Thanks

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zizban
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Unread postby zizban » Fri Oct 20, 2006 5:48 pm

Solaris. CDE is bad but you can replace it or make it Irix looking (there is a thread about this here: viewtopic.php?t=10990 )

Solaris is a nice Unix, easy to move around in, powerful and free.

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Re: Closest IRIX substitute...

Unread postby kshuff » Fri Oct 20, 2006 6:04 pm

jp_fan wrote:I am wondering... What is the closest relative to IRIX that I might be able to snag for free from the internet for an x86 platform? I would like to have a similar "utilitarian" look and feel to the desktop (GUI is an absolute MUST as I am just barely familiar with Linux/UNIX commands). I want something with a nice, light GUI that doesn't eat up much memory or hurt performance much.

Does anyone know of such a beast? I've looked at Plan9 and Inferno, which look interesting, but I cannot seem to understand how to run _any_ program on the thing... :oops:

Thanks


Most of IRIX is based on SVR4. Solaris, AIX, and UnixWare are probably the closest relatives to IRIX. If you want the look and feel of 4dwm in linux, check out the Indigo Magic Desktop at 5dwm.org
-ks

:Onyx: :Onyx: :Crimson: :O2000: :Onyx2: :Fuel: :Octane: :Octane2: :PI: :Indigo: :Indigo: :O2: :O2: :Indigo2: :Indigo2: :Indigo2IMP: :Indy: :320: :540: :O3x0: :1600SW: :1600SW: :hpserv:

See them all >here<

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foetz
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Re: Closest IRIX substitute...

Unread postby foetz » Fri Oct 20, 2006 6:13 pm

kshuff wrote:
jp_fan wrote:I am wondering... What is the closest relative to IRIX that I might be able to snag for free from the internet for an x86 platform? I would like to have a similar "utilitarian" look and feel to the desktop (GUI is an absolute MUST as I am just barely familiar with Linux/UNIX commands). I want something with a nice, light GUI that doesn't eat up much memory or hurt performance much.

Does anyone know of such a beast? I've looked at Plan9 and Inferno, which look interesting, but I cannot seem to understand how to run _any_ program on the thing... :oops:

Thanks


Most of IRIX is based on SVR4. Solaris, AIX, and UnixWare are probably the closest relatives to IRIX. If you want the look and feel of 4dwm in linux, check out the Indigo Magic Desktop at 5dwm.org


aix has a major bsd part but solaris and unixware are svr. actually unixware IS svr x.

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UNICes

Unread postby SAQ » Fri Oct 20, 2006 6:16 pm

Definitely Solaris- the price is right, it's technically quite good, and you see it often in the real world. AIX is reasonably common, but it's tied to RS/6000s that seem to hold their value pretty well. It's also somewhat proprietary/non-standard (as far as "standard" goes in UNIX). HP-UX is in the same boat, but hardware is less expensive. UnixWare is quite expensive and I have yet to see a good argument for it given the prices and licensing restrictions.

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josehill
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Unread postby josehill » Fri Oct 20, 2006 8:12 pm

Either Solaris or one of the BSDs.

In addition to the reasons mentioned by the others, Solaris is very common in business, so experience with it can help to open some employment doors.

On the other hand, I really like the BSDs for pedagogical reasons. The directory structure and some of the apps are a little different from System V oriented systems like IRIX and Solaris, but you can learn an awful lot about Unix in general by building a FreeBSD box or an OpenBSD box.

FreeBSD has good performance and very convenient learning materials (lots of good FreeBSD books out there), and OpenBSD is great for learning about security. There are several other very good BSDs, but IMHO they are probably less ideal for a new user for reasons of documentation, etc.

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zizban
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Unread postby zizban » Sat Oct 21, 2006 3:54 pm

I found that FreeBSD and Solaris are alike internally. I used FreeBSD for ages before getting a Solaris box and once I was in Solaris, I found it easy to move around.

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gcb
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Unread postby gcb » Thu Nov 02, 2006 5:55 pm

if you goal is to learn unix. OpenBSD.

you will NEVER run out of man pages. in fact, the 1st thing you see after the install is "go read man page X or else..." i think it ws "man intro" or something. that alone was a unix class.

it has an X. but i DO NOT recomend that you even install it. only if you`re gona use a browser.

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zizban
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Unread postby zizban » Thu Nov 02, 2006 6:23 pm

Well I could never get OpenBSD to install. I could get Net and FreeBSDs to install but OpenBSD always left me puzzled.

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Re: Closest IRIX substitute...

Unread postby SAQ » Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:29 pm

jp_fan wrote:(GUI is an absolute MUST as I am just barely familiar with Linux/UNIX commands). I want something with a nice, light GUI that doesn't eat up much memory or hurt performance much.

Does anyone know of such a beast? I've looked at Plan9 and Inferno, which look interesting, but I cannot seem to understand how to run _any_ program on the thing... :oops:

Thanks


Plan 9 is the UNIX concepts revisited. I'm not surprised you had problems- it would be a bit like saying "I know Windows NT, so I can do VMS". The same people (Ritchie in one case, Cutler in the other) worked on them, but they're totally different beasts (NO value judgements being made here at all).

Your limiting factor is going to be your statement about the "GUI being a must". Most Unices (including IRIX) require you to be proficient with the command prompt to administer the machine. Graphic helpers are provided for some things, but not others. Solaris will be an issue here, SMC only does the basics. AIX and HP-UX probably have the best hand-holding around, but those require better-than-PC hardware (RS/6000 and HP 9000, respectively). NetBSD comes with a text mode administrative tool that does many things, SCO still has sysadminsh, I believe (but you'll be paying through the nose for UnixWare, and its future is murky at best).
Get yourself a copy of the "UNIX Rosetta Stone" (bhami.com/rosetta) It's a good basic intro to UNIX commands across various implementations. All the major vendors have downloadable manuals that you can look at (IBM, Sun, HP, SGI), and the free implementations have decent documentation now, check out their websites.

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skywriter
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Unread postby skywriter » Fri Nov 03, 2006 10:01 am

Removing the personal attack. Please, remember, "Be nice".

it wasn't a personal attack. it was a suggestion concerning how to have a more meaningful life. but what the hell can't please eveyone.
Last edited by skywriter on Fri Nov 03, 2006 5:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
:Skywriter:

DECUS Member 368596

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foetz
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Unread postby foetz » Fri Nov 03, 2006 4:06 pm

gcb wrote:if you goal is to learn unix. OpenBSD.

you will NEVER run out of man pages. in fact, the 1st thing you see after the install is "go read man page X or else..." i think it ws "man intro" or something. that alone was a unix class.

it has an X. but i DO NOT recomend that you even install it. only if you`re gona use a browser.


have to second that.
openbsd is a real pure unix. no bells, no whistles, not at all :D
it's mature and quite secure, also stable and handy.
i've built several complete security solutions with openbsd as the main thing and all worked like a charm - always!


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