Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

For friendly off topic discussion not covered in a forum above.
Forum rules
No politics, please.

What's Your Stanford-Binet IQ?

<80
5
9%
80-89
0
No votes
90-99
1
2%
100-109
2
4%
110-119
0
No votes
120-129
7
13%
130-139
15
28%
140-149
12
22%
150-159
4
7%
160-169
4
7%
170-179
0
No votes
>=180
4
7%
 
Total votes: 54

User avatar
semi-fly
Posts: 786
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2003 5:29 am
Location: Ypsitucky, MI
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby semi-fly » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:23 am

I took an IQ test once. Rather then performing the standard IQ tests the researchers simply handed me a bucket and took a photo of the results. True story.
Attachments
bucketwm4.jpg
configure complete, now type 'make' and pray.

User avatar
squeen
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2933
Joined: Fri May 09, 2003 6:10 am
Location: Maryland, USA

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby squeen » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:50 am

semi-fly: I laughed so hard I almost wet myself. :lol:

User avatar
MisterDNA
Posts: 1089
Joined: Tue May 31, 2005 2:23 am
Location: Brigham City, UT

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby MisterDNA » Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:33 am

I scored 146 on the Stanford-Binet and 148 on the Slossen (sp?). I also scored 152 on the online test the High IQ Society gives, but it took some work (that damned sphere you're supposed to visualize is a pain).

Being all brains and no cock-n-balls (to quote the old man on Road Trip) is no way to live. I've probably lowered my apparent intelligence because I don't read encyclopedias cover-to-cover anymore, but I can talk to people, work on a team, lead a team, and talk to a female without passing out (it worked. I am married with a kid, after all). My stepdad once said all anyone needs is street smarts. That's why he works in concrete.

I didn't read the thread so this may already have been posted, but I like this quote: A wise man knows everything. A shrewd man knows everyone.

I've met a lot of people who are shrewd and only shrewd. I've known a lot of people who are wise and only wise. Too much of either one is bad.

I'm just glad I can still spell.

IQ is merely a measurement of how quickly one can learn. You can learn about every bowl of cereal Paris Hilton ever ate, every man Lindsay Lohan ever slept with and their favorite position, every time Britney Spears flipped out, or any other information that's useless beyond party conversation (or trying to get a teeniebopper in bed if you're into that) or you can learn how to make a piece of dirty sand do your work for you, learn how to communicate with people who don't speak your language, learn about space and how to pick stars out with a telescope (and maybe you'll take a girl out stargazing and ignite her passions), etc.

Maybe you learn how to mix every drink known to man, or become a connoisseur of wine (sommelier), or build a mental Rolodex of everyone you've ever met who offers a service of use to certain people, or anything else that may make you a hit at parties.

As it's been said, a high IQ gives you a sharper tool. What you use it for is your choice. But you still deal with the consequences of that choice.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.
-- I'm a PeeCee and I can kick your ass. --
Slow PeeCee - i7 940 OC 4.1GHz, 20GB DDR3 OC 1.8GHz, 2x1TB WD RAID0, ATI 5870 1GB, 3008WFP
Dev PeeCee - IBM Intellistation A Pro - Dual Opteron 290 2.8GHz, 8GB ECC DDR, 500GB SATA, 8400GS, 2x1800FP
Slow PeeCee Cluster - 30x Opteron 275, 60.5GB RAM, 2.2TB, 2x1.5TB
Octane 2xR12K-300, 1.5GB, 36GB 10K, 73GB 10K, V8
Indigo2 195MHz, 1GB, 36GB, SI

There are 10 kinds of people in the world:
Those who understand Ternary. Those who don't. Those who could give a shit less.

User avatar
Frapazoid
Posts: 1157
Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 9:49 am
Location: Poznan, Poland
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby Frapazoid » Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:42 am

every man Lindsay Lohan ever slept with and their favorite position


No I think the brain might have some sort of capacity limit.
Maverick 3: Athlon X2 7750, 2gb, Windows Vista
Frank Dux: SGI Octane2 R12k 400mhz 1.5gb

"Chief, look! I learned to make fire! Who knows what we could do with this... We should learn to control it!"

"Ridiculous. How can you justify wasting time and effort on this so-called 'fire' when our children are freezing to death at night?"

User avatar
Oskar45
Posts: 2258
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 2:35 am
Location: Vienna, Austria

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby Oskar45 » Fri Aug 24, 2007 10:43 am

Frapazoid wrote:
every man Lindsay Lohan ever slept with and their favorite position


No I think the brain might have some sort of capacity limit.

Really. Forget about *positions*. I enjoy a few things most women shudder away from, regardless of the position...
Everyone loves a lover. Romeo loves Juliet. Therefore, Trump loves Putin.

User avatar
fatal_error
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2005 9:41 am
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby fatal_error » Sat Aug 25, 2007 1:09 am

Yeah, and usually these things go along with the command line prompt :)

I dont know what my IQ is but frankly, as long as im capable doing everyday things ill be fine.

Back to the trailer park!

"coors light for everyone"
:Octane: :O2: :O2: :Indigo2IMP: :Indy:

User avatar
Nihilus
Posts: 310
Joined: Sat Dec 18, 2004 8:21 am
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby Nihilus » Sun Sep 02, 2007 12:51 pm

I took a test (Stanford-Binet) during high-school with my classmates. Someone asked me what my score was and I said 132 and a classmate corrected me with the words: "Now you're being humble, in fact it was 134." So that's what I go for... High IQ combined with social skills is importantant else it's pretty useless in common day situations (depending of your work ofc), it's like H2O, without the Oxygen you can't drink it.

EDIT: Read thru MisterDNA's post, I totally agree with him on it and he put it in a better way than me... :)
SGI Systems: R4K :Indigo:/256MB/XS-24, R5K 150MHz :Indy:/160MB/XL-24, R10K 175MHz :O2:/640MB, R12K 400MHz :Octane2:/Vpro6/1GB & R4K 250 MHz :Indigo2IMP:/128 MB/XZ Extreme/GIO64 FDDI

"It's a UNIX system! I know this! "

User avatar
Arie van Schutterhoef
Posts: 149
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 9:58 am
Location: Over the Rainbow
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby Arie van Schutterhoef » Sun Sep 02, 2007 1:21 pm

>What's Your Stanford-Binet IQ?
- minus 256 kelvin...

AvS

kramlq
Donor
Donor
Posts: 994
Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2005 5:10 pm
Location: IRL

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby kramlq » Sun Sep 02, 2007 8:37 pm

Never took an IQ test that I got the result of, but I have anecdotal evidence that I am not stupid:
- In school, the smartest guy of my age in the country was in my class (caused havoc with class grade curves :evil: ), and he once asked to borrow my maths homework because he couldn't work out the answer.
- In college, the smartest guy in the history of my course once sought me out a few mins before an exam wanting me to explain something to him.

So I've always said... I'm the guy the geniuses come to when they want answers :D :D :D

User avatar
starfoxacefox
Posts: 71
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 3:06 pm
Location: USA, CO, FANC
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby starfoxacefox » Fri Sep 14, 2007 4:10 am

129 here, slow at everything else but UNIX :P That what happen when OCD meets computer world.
The Paw Is the Way To Go

Image

Foxler of FoxRunner PC

User avatar
BrentDMartin
Posts: 386
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 10:41 am
Location: Huntsville, AL USA
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby BrentDMartin » Fri Sep 14, 2007 5:01 am

MisterDNA wrote:I scored 146 on the Stanford-Binet and 148 on the Slossen (sp?). I also scored 152 on the online test the High IQ Society gives, but it took some work (that damned sphere you're supposed to visualize is a pain).

Being all brains and no cock-n-balls (to quote the old man on Road Trip) is no way to live. I've probably lowered my apparent intelligence because I don't read encyclopedias cover-to-cover anymore, but I can talk to people, work on a team, lead a team, and talk to a female without passing out (it worked. I am married with a kid, after all). My stepdad once said all anyone needs is street smarts. That's why he works in concrete.

I didn't read the thread so this may already have been posted, but I like this quote: A wise man knows everything. A shrewd man knows everyone.

I've met a lot of people who are shrewd and only shrewd. I've known a lot of people who are wise and only wise. Too much of either one is bad.

I'm just glad I can still spell.

IQ is merely a measurement of how quickly one can learn. You can learn about every bowl of cereal Paris Hilton ever ate, every man Lindsay Lohan ever slept with and their favorite position, every time Britney Spears flipped out, or any other information that's useless beyond party conversation (or trying to get a teeniebopper in bed if you're into that) or you can learn how to make a piece of dirty sand do your work for you, learn how to communicate with people who don't speak your language, learn about space and how to pick stars out with a telescope (and maybe you'll take a girl out stargazing and ignite her passions), etc.

Maybe you learn how to mix every drink known to man, or become a connoisseur of wine (sommelier), or build a mental Rolodex of everyone you've ever met who offers a service of use to certain people, or anything else that may make you a hit at parties.

As it's been said, a high IQ gives you a sharper tool. What you use it for is your choice. But you still deal with the consequences of that choice.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.



I figured out something. I used to run on caffeine! I used to drink tons of it, and it made my brain work faster.

But I don't really think IQ is just a measure of quickness. Some people will never figure stuff out no matter how long they stare at it, and other people grasp things instantly. Einstein was estimated to have an IQ of "only 164", yet he did a lot of wonderful things with his intelligence. He was also very sociable, in some ways, loving to play his violin for an audience, crack jokes, and even make funny faces for the camera, such as sticking his tongue out. His unruly hair was part of his schtick. He fancied himself a wise philosopher and a comedian, and a musician. He certainly was all of that and more.

Maybe IQ is all about quickness of mind, if you absolutely insist, but I often take longer to arrive at the correct answer, so I can answer fewer questions during a given interval of time. But I think IQ is NOT JUST about quickness. I think there's also some aspects of learning involved, of learning to see things in certain ways, known as insight.

Chew on that. I've gotta dash, time for my kid to go to school. Be back later. I hate to be unsociable!
It can only be attributable to human error ...

User avatar
BrentDMartin
Posts: 386
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 10:41 am
Location: Huntsville, AL USA
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby BrentDMartin » Sun Sep 30, 2007 7:44 pm

I found a book of Mensa puzzles at a thrift store.

Some of the puzzles are pretty easy in the first two sections, and they get much harder in the third section.

I have my own opinion about such puzzles. A lot of them are based on well known series such as the names of the days of the weeks, or months, or the numbers. Many times the answer is obvious and many times it isn't so obvious. The more difficult puzzles tend to combine two or more methods of OBFUSCATION, so intelligence is the art of deobfuscating gibberish, or as Alan Turing might have said, "translation of a foreign language can be seen as a form of cryptography, considering the text to have been encoded using some sort of cryptographic method, and the job of the translator is to recover the orginal text, by hook or crook". I realize I just got slightly off topic, but figuring out a foreign language is a challenge somewhat akin to deciphering these logic puzzles.

I'm sure most people here know who Alan Turing was, but just in case someone doesn't, here's a blurb about him. Everyone has heard of the Turing Test for AI, right?

This article claimed that a program had passed the Turing Test, Joe Weintraub's PC Politician?
It's probably a little more intelligent than Eliza.

I guess the prize has already been claimed, if there was one. I could use the $$$.

http://www.turing.org.uk/turing/scrapbook/gsoh.html

http://www.robotwisdom.com/ai/nlp.html

Turing worked on the Manchester Mark I. I have a friend in Manchester who I play Snooker with online! I wonder if Turing was a Snooker player?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing

Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer.

Turing is often considered to be the father of modern computer science. Turing provided an influential formalisation of the concept of the algorithm and computation with the Turing machine, formulating the now widely accepted "Turing" version of the Church–Turing thesis, namely that any practical computing model has either the equivalent or a subset of the capabilities of a Turing machine. With the Turing test, he made a significant and characteristically provocative contribution to the debate regarding artificial intelligence: whether it will ever be possible to say that a machine is conscious and can think. He later worked at the National Physical Laboratory, creating one of the first designs for a stored-program computer, although it was never actually built. In 1948 he moved to the University of Manchester to work on the Manchester Mark I, then emerging as one of the world's earliest true computers.

During the Second World War Turing worked at Bletchley Park, Britain's codebreaking centre, and was for a time head of Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers, including the method of the bombe, an electromechanical machine that could find settings for the Enigma machine.

In 1952, Turing was convicted of "acts of gross indecency" after admitting to a sexual relationship with a man in Manchester. He was placed on probation and required to undergo hormone therapy. Turing died after eating an apple laced with cyanide in 1954. His death was ruled a suicide.

I wonder if Grey Fox might be another Turing in the making.

Poor Turing.


Here are some of the crypic sequences which often are used in logic puzzles:

MTWTFSS
JFMAMJJASOND
OTTFFSSENT

Some are based on prime number sequences.

2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, ...

Some are based on Fibonacci numbers:

1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55, 89, ...

Some puzzles involve squares:

1 4 9 16 25 36 49 ...

Some involve assigning codes to letters:

A = 1, B = 2, ..., Z = 26

And so on, there are obviously a huge number of ways of creating sequences and many people who can solve them quickly and easily and others like me who don't always recognize the obvious or see the forest for the trees. I guess that makes me a reject? lol If I cheat and look at the answers, does that make me more or less intelligent? BTW, I haven't looked at the answers yet. I've been keeping it in the bathroom where it belongs, along with all things Mensa, to read on the toilet during those sessions which require extended time. I'm sure there are many Mensa members who are nice people, but I've met up with too many of the ones who think their membership in the society makes them somehow super-special or me somehow unworthy of conversation with them. I found out I qualified to join and decided it wasn't worth the bother.

Sometimes I run across a puzzle where I can see absolutely no pattern to the numbers, or else I can see more than one way to complete the sequence, depending on which one occurs to me first. It also depends on what kind of mood I'm in. On some days I can solve a jigsaw puzzle in half the average time, and some days it takes me twice as long to do the same puzzle. I notice also that my CPU speed is about half as fast (half-assed) as that of many other people. I guess I'm slowing down in my old age. I tend to take longer to answer the questions than everyone else with whom I compete. lol I am not really a slow reader, but it takes extra time to read multiple questions and figure out the right answers, to filter out the trick questions, etc. I've always been slow, but like the tortoise and the hare, I sometimes win through sheer persistence. It helps to have a bit of the Rainman in my genetic makeup! I can be very obsessive about stuff I'm interested in and I can be fanatically disinterested in stuff that bores me, especially cleaning house, organization, etc. Jerry Pournelle used to call his home Chaos Manor. My apartment is way beyond Chaos Manor, it's more like Manic Mansion. I have more computers than I have time to do anything with. I somehow managed to buy six Indigo 2's over a period of time and each one was bought for some specific feature and I felt like I needed them at the time. Now I have a collection of them, but haven't turned one on for over a month now.

My latest project was fixing/repairing an old Dell Dimension 4400 (P4, 1.6 GHz, I think). I ended up buying one for $50 with most of the parts inside, adding an old hard drive. I may use it to run Ubuntu. I have to reinstall Ubuntu, since it has a different graphics card than the machine I took the hard drive out of, an old Athlon 700 MHz, which ran Ubuntu fine.

I think it's nice to be smart enough to work these stupid/silly Mensa problems, but I don't think they make you any smarter, just better at taking the stupid tests. I think some people (most people here at Nekochan) can do them much faster than I can. I think there are some problems I'd never figure out no matter how long I looked at the sequence. But if given enough time, I'd figure out at least 98% of them and earn my Mensa wings. I used to be much smarter before I suffered the stroke. That has to be the reason for my slowdown in my old age! lol Actually it was a stroke of good luck, since I no longer feel compelled to take those stupid IQ tests to prove how smart I am/was.

This long post is going to annoy Regan if he's still here! lol I didn't write it just for that reason! lol I created a blog once, but not even my best friends would admit to reading it, so maybe I have a ready-made audience of techogeeks here, no offense intended. I like hackers, geeks, freaks, programmers, engineers, etc. They are my favorite people, at least most of them, except for a few managers I once worked for.

I'm going to have to write a program to scan my posts and insert some extra lol's and lmao's and roflmao's at appropriate points. That would be a good task for Jerry Pournelle's wife. She wrote some sort of program to read text and analyze the grade level. I once was told that my German might be 7th grade level on a good day. That was many years ago. I was translating a set of error messages from English into German, French, and Spanish, for a commercial product for a company I used to work for. I'm not sure what level my English would be rated at. On a good day it might approach college level education, and on other days perhaps not.

I have gotten a lot of compliments on my writing in the past, although most people have said I'm long-winded. Mark Twain was long-winded. Lots of famous writers were long-winded.

I comfort myself with the knowledge that I have a personal knowledge base (KB) that far exceeds most people I know, including most famous actors and actresses I'd like to meet. I wonder if they would enjoy having dinner with me, or if I'd bore them out of their minds. Imagine having dinner with Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep,Jeff Bridges, Michael Douglas, Clint Eastwood, Anthony Hopkins, Jodie Foster, or your own favorite Hollywood stars. Would they be impressed with your knowledge of computers, SGI, SUN, HP, etc? lol I like to think I'm more interesting and educated than they are, at least from my own techno perspective.

I always wanted to meet Seymour Cray. He was killed in a car accident while I was in Colorado Springs on business once. He was there doing some kind of work related to SGI/Cray. His SUV rolled over and he made it to the hospital, but didn't survive the severe injuries suffered in the rollover. I worked on the CDC 6600 machines he designed or helped to design.

I remember having a CDC 6600 assembly language coding contest with a guy from Puerto Rico. He was at NASA Langley at the same time I was there as a co-op student, just learning to program in assembler, having just learned Fortran. The contest involved computing a floating point square root using Newton's method, using the minimum number of instructions and maximizing use of the instruction cache, to keep the main loop entirely in memory. I remember this neat blue book describing the CDC 6600 architecture and all the various instructions, with examples.

While I was there, I wrote a compiler for a subset of Fortran, as a student project one quarter. Back then, we wrote programs on coding forms and had them "keypunched", but I very quickly learned to use the machines and punched my own cards. My compiler could handle arithmetic expressions with parenthesization, and did some limited optimization, what might be called peep-hole optimization now.

While I was there, they got a new computer called the Star 100, which did vector processing. I worked in the Analysis and Computations Divsion (ACD) and very badly wanted to work on the optimizing compiler being developed there, but the guy who was working on it thought of me as a kid with no experience and of no use to him. He has sort of a British accent, sort of snobby sounding, as I recall. I was 19 when I arrived there in the Fall of 1972, and I finally left in the Summer of 1976, at age 23. I was in aerospace engineering in college, so I'd work a quarter at NASA, earn enough money to go to school a quarter, and I alternated like that for 7 quarters. During the last two of those quarters I got to work at ACD, which had been my dream job there, but I had spent five quarters prior to that working in various wind tunnels.

At each place (wind tunnel/facility) I found some kind of computational job to do, something involving numerical analysis and programming. I'd probably still be there now, had it not been for a hiring freeze instituted by Congress. So I went back to graduate school for two years, and did mostly numerical solutions involving Fortran programming on IBM 370 type mainframes, and CDC 6600/7600 mainframes at NASA. I later worked on CDC machines in Huntsville at TRW, at the army's Advanced Resarch Center (ARC).

I also worked on IBM mainframes for many more years, as they were in widespread use in Europe, at universities and in industry, such as at ERNO in Bremen and later Dornier Systems in Friedrichshafen/Immenstaad. I knew Fortran very well and also learned PL/I in college, on my own, and used PL/I instead of Fortran wherever possible. I did some of my thesis derivations using the PL/I version of FORMAC, an augmented version of PL/I, actually more of a preprocessor, which allowed one to do symbolic computations, similar to what can be done with Macysma or Mathematica.

I've been wanting to get an IBM 370 emulator and see if I can get something like that working on a PC!

Yes, I'm a dinosaur. I remember when wooly mammoths roamed the Earth and pterodactyls were a common sight in the sky. And people still used glass TTYs and keypunch machines, and paper tape punches and readers.

I'd better say, "Good night!", "Gute Nacht!", "Bonsoir!", "¡Buenas Noches!", etc.
It can only be attributable to human error ...

User avatar
Frapazoid
Posts: 1157
Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 9:49 am
Location: Poznan, Poland
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby Frapazoid » Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:48 am

Am I alone in hating those "Tickle" IQ test ads?

Aside from having such a gay name for a website, it's always some dumb trivia question in the ad.

"What's the most common eye color?"
a) green
b) blue
c) brown

"What color is the Moon?"
a) grey
b) toupe
c) burgundy

"What breed of dog is common depicted in firestations?
a) dalmation
b) husky
c) owl

Am I the only one who sees the obvious problem with asking a trivia question on an IQ test?

Maybe it's a trick. The real IQ test is if you notice it's bullshit or not.
Maverick 3: Athlon X2 7750, 2gb, Windows Vista
Frank Dux: SGI Octane2 R12k 400mhz 1.5gb

"Chief, look! I learned to make fire! Who knows what we could do with this... We should learn to control it!"

"Ridiculous. How can you justify wasting time and effort on this so-called 'fire' when our children are freezing to death at night?"

User avatar
BrentDMartin
Posts: 386
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 10:41 am
Location: Huntsville, AL USA
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby BrentDMartin » Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:38 am

There's a sucker born every minute. -- P.T. Barnum

Actually he may never have said that, but it is often attributed to him, and is "oh, so true!"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There's_a_ ... ery_minute

I think I'd love to make up tests and create a website and charge people for me to tell them how smart they are or how dumb they are. Of course, if they pay money, I'd have to tell them they are smarter than the average bear, unless they were just plain braindead and comatose.

I think asking trivia questions on an IQ test is not a good way to measure IQ, but a certain amount of "common knowledge" is required to be able to read an IQ test and answer the questions, certain assumptions must inherently be made about the people taking the test, based on culture, gender, race, occupation, etc. The psychologists who make up the tests often know very little or nothing about the kinds of people they are testing.

It takes all kinds of people to populate a planet. It takes a village to raise a child. lol

I'm certain that I'm more intelligent than most people, or at least that is one of the cornerstones of my personal belief system. If it isn't true, then everything else I've achieved crumbles into a pile of dust, to be vacuumed away when some one gets a Round Tuit.

I know people who know lots of trivia and beat me every single day on trivia quizzes. One guy claims that he is a lot smarter than I am, and proves it every day, by his knowledge of trivia, and by how fast he can answer the trivia questions. He almost never misses a question, or only rarely, and many questions are about SPORTS, something I know almost nothing about. Does that make me less intelligent because I'm not interested in sports and haven't paid any attention to soccer around the world? I have no idea who won the World Cup when, who scored the winning goal, what a "hat trick" is (until recently), or anything at all about some sports, like rugby, cricket, etc. Am I expected to know that kind of information in order to be deemed intelligent? I certainly hope not.

I only recently learned the names of a few "football" teams. I have friend from Manchester and apparently there are two clubs there, Manchester United, and Manchester City. Is it a political thing for me to bring up these names? Will this cause some sort of riot or uproar in the Nekochan stadium?

But no matter how carefully the tests are written, some sort of cultural bias always tends to creep into the test. How could it be otherwise? Many of the questions I miss on so-called IQ tests involve analogies between words, some of which I only have the vaguest idea what they mean. How am I supposed to know the meaning of words I've never been exposed to? Is there a certain minimum reading list that should be required for all people to be considered intelligent or educated? Am I to be criticized for never having read Pride and Prejudice and only having memorized in school the name of the author of said book? I recently watched the movie several times, and enjoyed it thorougly, and now I can answer all the trivia questions about P&P that I missed so often in the past! lol But I'm no more intelligent than I was before watching the movie. I read Lord of the Rings when I was a teenager, and don't remember all the details, but I can remember reading it straight through, as fast as I could, and enjoying the hell out of it. I don't always remember everything I read. Some things I just read for pleasure.

But how many times am I going to be asked the same stupid questions about various dog breeds before the test builders figure out that I don't really like dogs, that I'm a cat person, but still don't know any more about one breed of cat than another, or dogs, or any kind of birds or fish, plants, trees, or flowers. I just don't get into that kind of detail on some things. It might be interesting, but I've never taken the time to learn all that stuff, and never saw any real value in learning it, though it might somehow ENRICH my existence.

IQ is a fleeting thing. Mine is slowly ebbing away, I think! Or maybe I'm getting smarter and realizing that a lot of stuff I used to worry about doesn't really matter. I do think I'm a very intelligent person, and don't have the slightest bit of modesty about thinking so, never did, except when I'm in the presence of people who clearly outclass me intellectually (how I often feel here at Nekochan, btw). I haven't met too many individuals of that type that were interested in me or anything I had to say. Usually they were incredibly arrogant, pretentious, and unwilling to waste any of their own precious time conversing with a mere mortal like me. I really can't say I've met too many of them personally, but I am aware that there are people out there who can run circles around me intellectually, like the hare did to the tortoise to taunt him, in the proverbial race. But I take heart at being a tortoise, and I know I'll eventually get there, even if the hares are all there ahead of me and celebrating already.

That reminds me of an old Grimm's Fairy tale I once read, which has the same "hare and the tortoise" flavor. I remember it was about two hedgehogs from the Buxtehudeheide (Buxtehude Heath). The hedgehogs were married to one another, but looked so much alike that the rabbit could not tell the difference between them, so the hedgehog could win the race quite easily. They raced in a furrow the length of a field, and one hedgehog would begin the race, and the other one would be waiting at the other end of the furrow to declare victory! lol The poor rabbit ran himself to death back and forth, racing with the hedgehog(s) over and over till he collapsed. He never figured out the hedgehogs were pulling a switcheroo!


http://fairytales4u.com/story2/hare.htm


The moral of this story is, first, that no one, however distinguished he thinks himself, should make fun of a lesser man, even if this man is a hedgehog. And second, when a man marries, it is recommended that he take a wife from his own class, one who looks just like him. In other words, a hedgehog should always take care that his wife is also a hedgehog, and so forth.
It can only be attributable to human error ...

User avatar
Frapazoid
Posts: 1157
Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 9:49 am
Location: Poznan, Poland
Contact:

Re: Nekochan Census Poll: What's your IQ?

Unread postby Frapazoid » Tue Oct 02, 2007 1:48 am

It takes a village to raise a child. lol


It takes parents to raise a child, and a village to raise an idiot.
Maverick 3: Athlon X2 7750, 2gb, Windows Vista
Frank Dux: SGI Octane2 R12k 400mhz 1.5gb

"Chief, look! I learned to make fire! Who knows what we could do with this... We should learn to control it!"

"Ridiculous. How can you justify wasting time and effort on this so-called 'fire' when our children are freezing to death at night?"


Return to “Everything Else”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests